Everyday in the Outdoors

everyday in the outdoors sunrise

Intentionally spending time everyday in the outdoors can add amazing value to your day, to your mental health and to your life in general. Yet many people rush through their day without even a thought about it. When you invest time and energy into connecting with the outdoors and with nature each day, you stand to gain multiple health benefits including improved attention, reduced stress levels, improved sleep and a better mood. Spending even just a few minutes outside each day can start to make a difference.

Recently the Outdoors is my Therapy Facebook Group ran a 7 Day Challenge to share ideas about some of the ways we can all get connected with the outdoors on a more regular basis – so we feel better! And live better! All of these are completely do-able, perhaps with some modifications, no matter your fitness level, age, where you live or how mobile you are. Here are the 7 challenges we undertook to spend time everyday in the outdoors:

GO FOR A WALK

I’m referring here to simply walking around, moving your larger muscle groups and immersing yourself in your surroundings. Whilst daily exercise is very important, the act of getting your body in motion and connecting with the outdoors is the focus here. You can take a walk at various times during the day depending what works best for your routine.

Morning walk

Getting out into the natural sunlight first thing in the day helps your brain to wake up, re-sets your body clock so you’re ready for sleep again after dark, and forms a solid foundation for your day.

Lunch time walk

A mid-day walk helps to break up your day. Getting outside your usual workplace and changing your focus is one of the best stress breaks you can give yourself. Perhaps you’ll love it so much you’ll incorporate a daily constitutional into your regular workday routine.

End of the day walk

A stroll at the end of the day signifies the end of work and helps you transition to family time, personal time or relaxation time. Walking as the sun goes down is especially helpful to switch modes and settle for the evening.

WITNESS SUNRISE & SUNSET

Begin your day with the waking light of dawn and finish your work day as the sun sinks below the horizon – nature’s perfect bookends for your day! If you practise yoga, why not do some sun salutations as the sun rises or sets. Or use this special time for personal prayer, meditation or breathing or stillness practices. Sunrise and sunset are global phenomena which can help us feel connected with other people and places.

SPEND TIME IN A GARDEN

Are you fortunate enough to have your own outside yard? Or do you have pot plants, indoor plants or access to a local park or green space? Maybe you have an in-house kitchen garden with herbs or bean sprouts growing? Your daily garden routine could include weeding, pruning, watering, planting or harvesting. It could also include more physically demanding jobs such as fencing, making compost and nurturing your worm farm. If you don’t have your own garden, you can spend time planning your dream garden, creating a garden either in the earth, on your balcony or on your kitchen bench. Or you can use your senses to enjoy nature’s handiwork outdoors.

HAVE A GO AT BIRDWATCHING

Bring your attention to the bird life around you. What birds can you see? And hear? You might like to identify the various birds in your neighbourhood, or simply watch and listen to them. Over time you’ll notice their patterns and routines, flight paths, nesting sites, amusing behaviours, social groupings, and how they respond to seasonal changes.

PRACTISE MINDFUL PRACTICES

Mindfulness-based practices are wide and varied. In general the focus is on slowing down and bringing your attention to your surroundings and your experiences in the moment. This can be challenging because we spend so much of our lives rushing around.

Sensory mindfulness

One way to practise mindfulness in the outdoors is to observe the world around you through each of your senses one by one. Spend a couple of minutes noticing what you see, then move on to noticing what you hear, what you smell, what you feel, and so on.

Mindful walk

There are many variations of mindful walks too. You can be barefoot or wearing shoes. Begin by pausing for a few moments, close your eyes, take a few breaths and tune into how that feels in your body. Notice the sensations of the ground beneath your feet. Slowly open your eyes and draw your gaze to the ground slightly ahead of you. Move slowly forward one step at a time, bringing your attention to the sensations as you move your foot forward – lifting, moving, placing it down, and adjusting your balance. Repeat this for each step you take bringing your attention back to the sensations of walking each time your mind wanders. Continue for a few minutes, then when you are ready to finish, pause again, close your eyes, take a few breaths and then open your eyes. This is a wonderful moment for a gratitude practice.

FIND THE LITTLE TREASURES

Make new discoveries in your outdoor spaces every day. When you begin to look, you can find little treasures everywhere! Cobwebs hiding in the corners of the fence. Bugs scurrying in search of new homes. Grasses beginning to seed. Leaves swaying in the breeze. The soft sound of bird wings as they fly by. Grains of sand sparkling in the sunlight. The feel of the breeze as it moves your hair or caresses your skin. The smell of the eucalyptus tree.

CELEBRATE LIFE WITH A PICNIC

Picnics are the perfect way to celebrate life and the outdoors. They are equally delightful whether you go solo or share it with others. Picnics can be simple or complex, planned or spontaneous, romantic or practical. All you need is some food and somewhere suitable outdoors. You might like to have a picnic rug, chairs or a park bench to sit on, but finding a fallen log or rock is heaps of fun too.

Pre-preparing picnic food can be pretty special, however turning your ordinary everyday meal into a picnic outdoors is a fabulous way to liven up your day. If you like, you can bring some extra activities with you such as a camera to do some photography, bat and ball games, “I Spy” games, books and crosswords. Turn your picnic into an adventure by adding a physical challenge to it, for example hiking or biking into your picnic spot.

Let's sum up!
We had a lot of fun sharing these activities during our 7 Day Outdoor Challenge. Which ones would you like to incorporate into your routine for getting outdoors everyday? Or what other actions are you feeling inspired to take to get connected everyday in the outdoors?

Head over to our Facebook Group to view the videos and threads about our #7DayOutdoorChallenge and share your ideas with us. By the way (if you’re not already a member) when you request to join the Group you’ll be asked to answer some questions before you can join (so we know you’re not a robot!) and you need to agree to the rules which are there to keep the group as a safe space for sharing and inspiring.

You can also listen to this article in the Outdoors is my Therapy podcast!

Kathryn talks you through how you can incorporate a daily routine of spending time in the outdoors that works for you!

Daisy Spoke avatar has long curly hair and smiling mouth

Discovering mountain biking as life’s ultimate parallel universe in her middle age, Kathryn Walton shares information and reflections in ‘Daisy Spoke’ that inform, inspire and empower women to a healthy and active lifestyle.

How to have an outdoors staycation

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In this article, I am going to share some ideas with you about how to have an outdoors stay-at-home holiday (or staycation) during isolation.

Isolation means holidays will be different this year

With much of the world practising various levels of isolation to protect themselves and everyone else from covid19, we’re all facing having our next holiday at home. Not only at home, but without even travelling away for picnics, bushwalks and day trips; no friends coming over for a BBQ and game of backyard cricket; no fishing expeditions, group rides or sleepovers.

If you’re anything like me and my family, you may not have ever had a home-based holiday that didn’t involve trekking from place to place, taking in a different mountain bike trail each day, or meeting friends for outdoor adventures in a National Park.

New experiences are simply adventures in disguise

So, being at home and not having the freedom to travel and socialise in person might be a new experience for you too. And new experiences are simply adventures in disguise! This is the perfect opportunity to create glorious memories in new and unexpected ways.

Here is a list of outdoors and nature-based mini-adventures that you can have right on your doorstep ….. literally! Many of these activities are family-friendly and suitable for most people if you are feeling well. If you’re a bit under the weather, I think you’ll find something here too if you take it at your own pace.

wild flowers in background with text that says adventures are for everyone

20 staycation mini-adventures to have on your own doorstep

  1. Backyard Picnic – Pack a delicious picnic for your family or house mates, grab some card games and a few books, spread the picnic rug in the backyard, put up your sun shelter or umbrella, sit back, relax and enjoy your picnic.
  2. Nature Craft – Collect nature items from your garden and craft them into a nature collage or arrangement. Search the Internet for ideas if you need inspiration.
  3. Sunset Wind Down – Set the alarm for half an hour before sunset, grab your favourite pre-dinner drinks and nibblies, and get outside to enjoy the colour show.
  4. Star Gazing – Prepare for an evening of star gazing by researching what you might expect to see in the night sky where you live. This is best done on an evening around the new moon phase, minimal light pollution, and a clear sky. Check out the apps that help you get the most out of your astronomical adventures.
  5. Sunrise Captures – Set the alarm for this adventure too if you’re not an early riser. Make sure you’re outside well before dawn to watch the sun greet the new day. Why not make it a regular adventure and capture the moments in photographs!
  6. Herb Gardens – Plant some herb seedlings or seeds in the garden or in pots. Seedlings might be ready for you to use in a holiday cooking adventure within a couple of weeks.
  7. Make a Movie – Use the video app on your smart phone or camera to film a documentary about your backyard or park if you are permitted to go there.
  8. Outdoor Dance Party – Create a playlist of your favourite music, put together some party food, and groove and move outside. If you have close neighbours you could invite them to join the fun ….. while they stay on their own side of the fence of course, and no sharing of food either. And as always be considerate of the noise level and timing of your dance party.
  9. Outdoors Yoga and Meditation – Take your indoors practice into the outdoors for the added benefit of fresh air, Vitamin D and all the goodness that nature has to share with you.
  10. Cubby House – Grab some old sheets or blankets and throw them over the top of the clothes line, the laundry trolley or other structure that’s suitable. Grab a good book, some board games or a picnic lunch and relax for the afternoon.
  11. Bushcraft – You’ll need some milled timber that you might have lying around in the shed or some sticks in the garden, as well as some rope or baling twine. Tie the sticks together into a tee-pee, chair, table or other construction that sparks your interest.
  12. Backyard Spotlighting – Spend some quiet time in your own yard after dark getting to know the night creatures and noises that often go unnoticed. Your eyes will adjust to the dark after a few minutes, but if you use a torch, take care to respect your neighbours as well as the wildlife that might be startled by the light.
  13. Outdoor Movies – Take your laptop outside either during the day or evening for an outdoor movie experience. Add to the atmosphere with popcorn and chocolate coated ice cream!
  14. Mindful Walk – You can use a mindful walk in your own garden to ground yourself and bring a sense of stability into your day. As you slowly walk around, observe how each step feels right through your whole body. You can do this in bare feet or wearing shoes.
  15. Working Bee – This is a great time to knock over that backyard job that seems to keep getting put off. Call your family or house mates together for a working bee followed by a celebratory shared meal. Don’t forget the before and after photos!
  16. Adventure Gear Check – Your staycation might be a timely chance to pull out your adventure gear and check it over – backpacks, panniers, hydration systems, sleeping bags, tents, boots, stoves and so on. Do you need to de-clutter? Upgrade? Repair? While you’re at it, you could set up the tent and camp out in your own yard for the night.
  17. Knotting – Grab a knotting book, You Tube tutorial or an app and get outside while you practise knots that come in handy on your adventures that take you further afield from home.
  18. Obstacle Course – Set up an obstacle course or an exercise circuit in your yard, and then get to it! You can create games and challenges using a stop watch, timer or a playlist of music.
  19. Birdwatching – Use a bird identification book, app or the Internet to identify the birds that visit your neighbourhood. You can record these in a journal or using one of the apps like eBird that has built-in data collection.
  20. Make-Your-Own-Adventure – Get your family and friends to help brainstorm mini-adventures that you can have without even leaving home. Perhaps you could connect in virtually with each other mid-adventure for a shared meal and a few laughs?

It’s not about coping – it’s about turning it into an adventure!

There will be many of us having a staycation over Easter and later in the year while we’re in isolation. It’s not a matter of learning to cope with it. It’s a matter of making the most of every opportunity to turn the moments into adventures and wonderful memories.

What will you do to have adventures on your staycation?

It’s over to you now – which of these mini-adventures are you going to try out first? What other ideas do you have for making the most of your staycation? How will your staycation strengthen your well-being?

bushwalking boots

You can listen to this article on the Outdoors is my Therapy podcast!

Daisy Spoke avatar has long curly hair and smiling mouth

Discovering mountain biking as life’s ultimate parallel universe in her middle age, Kathryn Walton shares information and reflections in ‘Daisy Spoke’ that inform, inspire and empower women to a healthy and active lifestyle.

The Fearful Adventurer: 5 hacks to turn fear into adventure

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I’ve always believed I operate best when I can plan ahead and organise or control the situation around me so it was with a deep breath that I set off on my current journey with barely a glance at a map. In fact I didn’t even pack my bag till the morning I left, and had so much on my mind and so many work tasks to complete that I hadn’t given the two week “April Adventure” road trip covering approximately 4200kms much thought at all. 

RainforestMy Year of Adventure in fact began on New Year’s Eve as I set off on a week long road trip with my family to Melbourne and back home again traversing half the eastern side of Australia. With one daughter now settled in Victoria, I refocused my attention on developing new online programs and resources for women. I was thrilled to take my “February Adventure” to Hahndorf in South Australia to participate in and present at the Thriving Women 2018 conference. My “March Adventure” was closer to home with weekends and day trips to several magnificent National Parks, immersing myself in one of my great loves – bushwalking. 

So here I am on my “April Adventure”. This journey has snuck up very quickly on me, and if I had paused for a moment to think about it, I’m sure I would have had2 single tents a lot of “what if’s” and identified as a fearful and hesitant adventurer rather than a brave one. My April Adventure has brought up a number of ‘firsts’ for me – I’ve left half my family behind, I’m travelling with only one companion (my younger daughter) through some fairly remote parts of Australia, I’m camping in a tent by myself, I’m having to step up and make decisions I’ve not been responsible for previously, and I’m operating a business far from home and frequently without mobile reception or internet connection. 

With a firm belief in stepping outside my comfort zone in order to learn and grow as a person, I chose to embrace the opportunities that my April Adventure has gifted me. And to satisfy my need for structure and predictability, I’ve created 5 hacks to manage potential feelings of overwhelm and anxiety about the ‘bigness’ of this adventure. I know you’ll find them useful too if you ever experience a sense of trepidation when stepping outside your comfort zone. 

5 Hacks To Turn Fear Into Adventure

1. Break the task up into smaller tasks (or adventures) and focus on one at a time. 

For me, I’ve been focusing on the day and night ahead – my next destination, my next meals, my next fuel stops – instead of worrying so much about the camp site and weather conditions at my final destination. Each day is a mini adventure in itself. Don’t miss out on these little adventures because you’re looking too far ahead. 

View from car windscreen

2. Look around you, focus on the moment.

I never tire of looking out the window on road trips. The subtle changes in scenery, weather, road conditions, flora and fauna, lifestyle, language, and local industries. I absolutely love it. I wonder what it would be like to live here, to have been here hundreds of years ago, the stories of the First Nation’s people in this area, I wonder who built these roads and when and how,  what do the local people do in their everyday lives…… Captivated by my immediate surroundings, I’ve found my wandering mind is creative and free, and not constrained by my fear mongering reptilian brain. 

View of landscape

3. Maintain a routine

My social media posts on Facebook and Instagram during my trip have reflected a very important part of my routine that keeps my mind, body and spirit healthy – morning exercise! It’s not always possible to complete my entire routine but by taking a flexible approach I’ve kept my head and heart on an even keel. 

Bushwalking

4. Listen to podcasts, Commonwealth Games news, audio books, music, anything of interest!

How lucky was it that my trip coincided with the 2018 Commonwealth Games on the Gold Coast. Never a dull moment on the radio when we can pick up the commentary, and always opportunities to listen to pre-downloaded podcasts, training videos or catch up on a bit of blogging! Giving your attention something to hook onto prevents it from wandering away into the land of the most feared!

Reading at camp

5. Chat to people around you. 

You never know your connections until you have a conversation with someone. Connections bring the world closer together, enhance empathy, and create opportunities for sharing stories and understanding. Looking outwardly minimises anxiety about our own situations and relaxes our mindsets. 

Person standing on viewing platform

NOW, has anyone got any hacks to help me deal with the outback flies????!

What hacks do you have for managing the discomfort you feel when stepping outside your comfort zone?

Discovering mountain biking as life’s ultimate parallel universe in her middle age, Daisy Spoke aka Kathryn Walton logoKathryn Walton shares information and reflections in Daisy Spoke that connect, inspire and self-empower women to make healthy choices for themselves. She integrates her love of physical exercise, family, nature, gardening and creative arts with her professional background in mental health social work to facilitate change with individuals, groups and communities of women who are committed to living life to the full.